Bear’s Space Explorations: Part 2

This is another addition of Michael “Bear” Bryant’s facebook posts about space exploration. If you missed the first installment click here.

The gov’t continues to slowly release info detailing their investigations of UFOs…

                                                                                    FBI opens online vault, revealing UFO, Roswell files

 

Well over a thousand galaxies are known members of the Virgo Cluster, the closest large cluster of galaxies to our own local group. In fact, the galaxy cluster is difficult to appreciate all at once because it covers such a large area on the sky. Spanning about 5×3 degrees, this careful mosaic of telescopic images clearly records the …central region of the Virgo Cluster through faint foreground dust clouds lingering above the plane of our own Milky Way galaxy. The cluster’s dominant giant elliptical galaxy M87, is just below center in the frame. Above M87 is the famous interacting galaxy pair NGC 4438, also known as The Eyes. A closer examination of the image will reveal many Virgo cluster member galaxies as small fuzzy patches. Sliding your cursor over the image will label the larger galaxies using NGC catalog designations. Galaxies are also shown with Messier catalog numbers, including M84, M86, and prominent colorful spirals M88, M90, and M91. On average, Virgo Cluster galaxies are measured to be about 48 million light-years away. The Virgo Cluster distance has been used to give an important determination of the Hubble Constant and the scale of the Universe.
 A detonation from 4.5 billion years ago! A symphony of planet-wide observations began abruptly on March 28 when the Earth-orbiting Swift satellite detected a burst of high-frequency gamma-rays from GRB 110328A. When the same source flared again after a 45 minute pause it was clear this event was not a typical gamma-ray burst. Twelve h…ours after the initial fanfare astronomers using the 2.5-meter Nordic Optical Telescope chimed in with a mid-range observation of the optical counterpart. Early the next day the explosion was picked up in baritone low-frequencies of radio waves by the ELVA radio dishes in the USA. Later many optical telescopes, including the 8-meter Gemini North telescope in Hawaii, began playing along by tracking the optical counterpart. The unusual source was spotted at a higher register in X-rays by the Chandra X-ray Observatory and was intermittently followed in the even more soprano-like gamma-ray range for a week. Joining the chorus, Hubble Space Telescope recorded this image in optical and infrared light, confirming that the flash was located along the path of a galaxy at redshift 0.351. If associated with the galaxy, this explosion occurred when the universe was about two thirds of its present age. There is much speculation that the unusual gamma-ray burst was a star being ripped apart by a supermassive black hole in the center of a galaxy and the puzzling features of the distant detonation are still being explored.
The black hole at the heart of M87 is large enough to swallow our entire solar system and has the same mass as 6.8 billion suns. Even its event horizon – the edge from within nothing can escape, not even light – is four times as large as the orbit of Neptune. This black hole M87 is almost twice as big as scientists had previously thought. But scientific breakthroughs mean even bigger ones are likely to be found in the next few years.
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1347359/Biggest-black-hole-M87-big-swallow-ENTIRE-solar-system.html#ixzz1JsrMZRZj

More Great “Space Posts” from Bear coming soon!

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase its exploration and/or development of space beyond the Earth’s mesosphere.

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